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Financial Library

Asset Building Strategies

In the last article Sue had a capital shortfall of $400,000 in order to support her desired retirement lifestyle. This amount will vary for each individual and will be larger or smaller depending upon your income, age and ability to save money as a percentage of your earned income.

Needs vs Wants

There are things you need to live a healthy life, like a place to live and food to eat. There are also things that you'd like, such as a warm vacation or new ski boots. It's possible to have it all, but not all at once. If you can't afford to pay your bills for necessities like rent/mortgage, groceries, and utilities, you're not ready to soak up the sun on a sandy beach.

You've retired. Now what?

Canadians are living longer, healthier lives. According to Statistics Canada (2018), the average life expectancy is 80 years for men and 84 years for women. This means your retirement years may almost equal your working ones. Family therapist Rhonda Katz suggests taking some time before retirement to identify what you find enjoyable in life and thinking of ways to sustain that happiness level. She also says to honestly answer the following questions:

'Is there some aspect of my job that I would love to keep doing?'

Strategic or Target-Based Planning

Financial success methodologies have evolved over the past 30 years with the advent of increasing computational power. Originally, planning was a simple spreadsheet projection of your current situation, plus some assumptions, such as savings rates, tax rates, investment returns and inflation rates. This would give you an idea of what your final destination would look like with much of the calculations being driven by Future Value and Present Value tables.

Role Reversal - The New Reality

Our parents raised us; we moved out, had children of our own and raised them. Then our children moved out and had children of their own to raise. It was supposed to stop there for us, but then one day we had to look after one or both of our parents.

According to a 2020 Federal Government report1, 25% of Canadians 15 years or older provide long term care to a family member. According to the Long-Term Care Planning Network, we may spend as many years caring for a parent as we did raising a child.

Beware of These Scams Aimed At Seniors

According to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre1, in 2023 there were over 62,000 reported fraud victims. Seniors in Canada are get bilked out of more than $500 million every year. It is estimated that as many as one in five seniors have lost money to fraudsters and most don't report it.

Even though seniors today may be mentally sharper than ever, they are still the con artists' favorite target because they generally have more disposable cash and are often more trusting.

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